Calligraphy Pens

Calligraphy is an art form that almost anyone can enjoy. If you’ve said "I don’t have a artistic bone in my body", you may be surprised, that with the right pen in hand, you could have a hidden artistic flare you never knew you had. Recently here at Writer’s Bloc I was able to "play" with some great Calligraphy Pens.  
 
The Pilot Parallel Pen 3.8mm has a wide nib that makes wide, large letters. This pen, as well as the 6.0mm nib Parallel Pen, would work well with projects that call for large lettering. Great for personalizing blank cards or to make signs that need to be easy to read. For smaller lettering, the Parallel Pen also comes in 1.5mm and 2.4mm nib sizes. This pen has an interesting gradation function that allows you to gradually change your writing from one color to another color.

The Pelikan Script Calligraphy Pen with a 1.5mm nib was my favorite because the nib size made what I thought was the just right stroke width for calligraphy writing in my personal letters and cards.  The angle and nib is given to making clean calligraphy letters.  A must have for the calligraphy writers among us. It is available with 1.0mm and 2.0mm nibs as well.
 
The Lamy Joy Calligraphy Pen with a 1.1mm nib makes a fine line that is very appealing to those of us who write a little smaller. A great Pen!! It glides smoothly across the paper, almost making writing effortless. This pen makes beautiful writing fun. You can also get this pen with a 1.5mm or 1.9mm nib.
 
All three of these Calligraphy Pens are well made fountain pens. They feel great in the hand and flow smoothly and evenly. They truly make for unique and stylish lettering that gives individuality to any writing endeavor.  
 
Discover the artist in you and have fun doing it!!
 
 
Lorraine at Writer’s Bloc

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Platinum Preppy Highlighter Pen

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I am so happy to finally find the Preppy Highlighter from Platinum Pens!

Liquid ink highlighters have always been my favorite, but I use them up quickly and was tossing multitudes of plastic pens into the trash. I could picture the creation of a small landfill with my name on it, mounded up with dried up highlighter pens… but not any more! Preppy highlighters are refillable with ink cartridges that come with fresh replacement nibs when mine starts to wear out. I can also use a converter to easily refill the pen with whatever ink I choose.

The cartridge that comes with the Preppy Highlighter lasted me about one month, or roughly 275 lines of highlighting text printed on 8 1/2″ x 11″ paper. I chose to refill my pen with Noodler’s Firefly Highlighting Ink. After using 3 cartridges full of ink, the tip of the pen had become softer than I prefer so it was time to replace it with a Platinum Preppy Highlighter Replacement Tip.

The ink I have my eye on next is Noodler’s Ink Year of the Golden Pig. This highlighting ink will not fade and comes with a free eyedropper fill Preppy Highlighter Pen to save money and help the environment.

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Staedtler Aquarell Pencils & Clairefontaine Sketch Pad

Ever since I heard about Staedtler’s Ergosoft Aquarell Coloured Pencils I have been wanting to give them a try. These pencils have watercolor lead for dry and wet blending, providing a wide range of creative possibilities when coloring, drawing or watercoloring with water and brush. I’m not an artist, but this sounded like fun! Even though Clairefontaine makes watercolor pads, I decided to pair the pencils up with a Clairefontaine Sketch Pad because the paper has a smoother finish. For my first experiment I doodled a picture of my cat, Mulder. Here is what the picture looked like before using a wet paintbrush:

Here is what the picture looked like after using a wet paintbrush:

This was created simply by making a pencil sketch first, and then applying a small wet paintbrush. As soon as the colors got wet they seemed to "melt" and became brighter and more intense. Different color shades could easily be blended. The paper did wrinkle a bit, so the heavier weight watercolor paper might have been better, but I felt the smoother sketch pad paper might be easier for making fine pencil lines. This was a fun project and I’m looking forward to trying some different techniques. Which picture looks better? I’ll let you decide….

If any of you have artwork created by Staedtler Aquarell pencils you would like to share, please email it to us at info@shopwritersbloc.com. We’ll share our favorites in a future blog post!

 

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