Is it really cheaper to use bottled ink?

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We found a very interesting comparison regarding the cost of using bottled ink vs. the cost of using ink cartridges tucked inside a Noodler’s Ink box and wanted to share this helpful information with you.

According to research done by Noodler’s a 4.5 oz bottle of their ink has the amount of ink equal to $72.94 worth of the least costly retail ink cartridges in the world. When you consider that in June 2009 Writer’s Bloc sells Noodler’s 4.5 oz bottles for between $17.50 and $19.00, this is around a $55.44 savings over using even the cheapest cartridges! In addition, Noodler’s Ink has a reputation for being good quality, is safe for all fountain pens and comes in a wide range of colors, which is something you might not get using those cheap cartridges.

Quotes obtained by Noodler’s Ink in January 2009 reveal that the ink in cartridges from some European, Japanese and North American companies sells for $148.00 per 4.5 oz and even well over $315.00 per 4.5 oz of ink. That is some outrageously expensive ink!

Using bottled ink when you can just makes sense – it is easier on the environment and it is by far a much better deal than ink cartridges!

 

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Is it safe to take a fountain pen on an airplane?

Fountain pen users love to travel just as much as everyone else, so why not travel with your fountain pen even when you fly! There is the possibility that a fountain pen will leak in-flight when the air pressure in the plane cabin drops and the higher air pressure inside the pen forces ink out of the nib. However, there are some simple steps that can be taken to reduce or eliminate this risk.

First of all, it can help to travel with your fountain pen either completely full of ink (the air expands, not the ink) or completely empty (no ink, no leaks). Using cartridges with your pen is practical because you can travel with a new cartridge and an empty pen and insert the cartridge after you land.

It is best if you bring your fountain pens in your carry-on baggage instead of putting them inside your checked bags. For extra safety, put them inside ziploc bags and store them with the nib pointing up.

I’ve flown with both LAMY and Preppy fountain pens with varying amounts of ink in the cartridges and not had any problems other than a tiny bit of extra ink appearing on the LAMY nib. Alan has flown with a Kaweco Sport fountain pen containing a full cartridge as well as LAMY pens with only partially full cartridges and not had any leaks. The only problem Alan has encountered was with an eyedropper fill Kaweco pen that was not completely full of ink. This pen leaked small beads of ink during the flight. Do any of you have a flying with fountain pen experience that you would like to share with us?

 

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Crash Course in Fountain Pen Cartridges

When I first got my pink Platinum Preppy Fountain Pen I was very nervous about putting the cartridge in. I didn’t want to push it so hard that it ruined the pen, but I also wanted to make sure it was attached securely so the ink wouldn’t leak and ruin my purse. After getting some feedback I realized that I wasn’t alone in my fears, so I decided to share what I’ve learned about fountain pen cartridges to help others calm their fears about putting their pens together.

First of all, the tension that you feel when pushing the cartridge into the pen comes from the stopping device at the top of the cartridge, meant to keep ink in prior to assembly. In the Platinum Preppy Fountain Pen Cartridges this is a small metal ball, in standard cartridges (like J. Herbin Universal) it is a tiny glass ball, and in LAMY cartridges it’s just a thin layer of plastic. When you push the cartridge in you are not only attaching it to the pen, you are pushing the stopper device in and starting the ink flow.

The way to put cartridges in is fairly simple: slowly and gently while ensuring a firm attachment. Put it in straight on and start pushing gently. When you feel the tension from the release of the stopping device it should be just about in, and a tiny extra push to secure it won’t hurt.

Once the cartridge is attached to the pen it takes a little while for the ink to flow through the feed to the nib. Allow your pen to sit for awhile before you try to write with it. If the ink doesn’t seem to be getting to the nib, let the pen rest with the cap on and the nib pointing downwards. If you’re still having trouble getting it to write you can run cool water over the nib or pull the cartridge out and put a couple of drops of ink on the nib to encourage the ink to flow.

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