Shades of Red – Ink Mixing With J. Herbin 1670 Anniversary Ink

I’m really not quite sure what I expected with this ink mixing experiment, but then that’s what experiments are for, aren’t they? The 1670 Anniversary red ink is one of J. Herbin’s most saturated ink colors, so adding just a touch of another ink color made almost no difference in some mixes, but other mixes offered a more dramatic change. I’m not sure how much you’ll notice in this scan, but anyway here it goes. I used 5 parts 1670 Anniversary red ink and one part of another color of J. Herbin ink.

 

1670 Anniversary ink mixed with Bleu Pervenche made a red-black looking ink with a purplish undertone.

I didn’t notice much of a change to the 1670 Anniversary color when I added Rose Cyclamen to it, however, I can see a tinge of magenta when there is shading.

Bouton D’or also did not change the color of the 1670 Anniversary ink much. If anything, it may have warmed up the color an eensy bit.

1670 Anniversary plus Perle Noire creates a conservative black-red color with noticeable red in the shading.

1670 Anniversary with bright green (created from 5 parts Bouton’Dor and 1 part Bleu Pervenche – similar to Vert Pré) makes dark red.

Adding Violette Pensée to 1670 Anniversary ink also creates dark red, but this dark red is more of a maroon color. This was my favorite new color from the experiment.

What are your favorite red fountain pen ink colors?

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J. Herbin Gris Nuage Ink Mixing Test

I had some fun the other night experimenting with mixing J. Herbin Gris Nuage grey ink with other colors of J. Herbin fountain pen inks. For this test I used the ratio of five parts Gris Nuage and one part the other color of ink. I used a Clairefontaine Basics notebook for the paper, which held up quite well despite being heavily doused with ink.

Gris Nuage plus 1670 Anniversary Rouge Hematite ink turned out to be a toned-down version of red, not as bright as the 1670 ink on its own. Not a dramatic change, but who would want to change this great red color anyway?

When Bleu Pervenche was added to Gris Nuage the result was a turquoise-grey color. Nice shading in this combination.

The big surprise was Bouton D’or turned Gris Nuage into a great army green color with lots of shading. This was my favorite result and I filled up my Pelikano Junior with this color immediately!

Gris Nuage plus Violette Pensee resulted in a dark purple-grey color as expected.

My second favorite result was the Gris Nuage and Rose Cyclamen combination. This turned out to be a satisfying purple color with pink undertones.

Anyone else have a favorite ink mixing combination using J. Herbin Gris Nuage ink?

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Lime Green Fountain Pen Ink Recipe

One of my favorite custom-mixed fountain pen ink colors is lime green. It’s a happy, energizing color that makes me think of the first buds of spring. I like using 5 parts Noodler’s Yellow Ink with 1 part Noodler’s Navajo Turquoise to create the lime green fountain pen ink shown in this picture. It’s a nice bright green, yet it is dark enough to use on a regular basis in my fountain pens. This sketch is made in an Exacompta silver edged sketchbook which contains some of my favorite paper for use with a fountain pen. I used my Pelikan Pelikano fountain pen with a left-handed nib as well as a fountain pen from Japan with a very fine nib. For my extra fine point fountain pens I like to use a tiny little bit extra Navajo Turquoise in the mix.

A similar lime green ink color can be made using the same proportions of ink and J. Herbin Bouton D’or and J. Herbin Bleu Pervenche. If you prefer using cartridges or you don’t like ink mixing, J. Herbin Vert Pré is a light lime green color available in both standard universal cartridges and bottles. I find that Vert Pré ink looks best when used with a medium or broad nib.

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J. Herbin Fountain Pen Ink Mixing

J Herbin 4 basic ink mixing colors

After we wrote about mixing a few basic Noodler’s Ink colors to create a rainbow of other colors, one of our helpful readers mentioned that the same thing can be done with J. Herbin Fountain Pen Ink.

The equivalent of Noodler’s Navajoe Turquoise, Shah’s Rose, Yellow and Black (CMYK) in the J. Herbin line of inks would be:

Cyan = Bleu Pervenche
Magenta = Rose Cyclamen
Yellow = Bouton D’or
Black = Perle Noire

Thanks, Will, for pointing this out! Here at Writer’s Bloc we decided it would be a good idea to have all of these J. Herbin La Perle des Encres Fountain Pen Ink colors available so we ordered Bouton D’or and Bleu Pervenche to add to our bottled ink collection. Now we’re equipped for those of you who would like to give ink mixing a try with J. Herbin’s popular and enduring fountain pen inks.

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Ink Mixing Color Chart

From Ink Mixing (click on the picture to enlarge it)

For those of you new to color theory, figuring out how much of which colors to mix together to create the custom fountain pen ink color you want can be daunting! We figure most of you fellow fountain pen users already are creative people, but if you feel you need a bit of help with ink mixing, we’ve created a basic color chart as a guide.

This chart displays the recipe, or ratios of which ink colors to use to create other custom ink colors. For example, mixing one part magenta (Noodler’s Shah’s Rose) and one part yellow makes orange.

You might think that one part magenta and one part cyan would make purple, but instead it makes a violet-blue. To create purple ink you need only one part cyan (Noodler’s Navajoe Turquoise) and five parts magenta (Noodler’s Shah’s Rose).

In general, it is best to start with the lightest color of ink and slowly mix in the darker colors until you get the results that you want. For example, a small amount of Noodler’s The Whiteness of the Whale ink can be transformed into pink or light blue with just a few drops of Shah’s Rose or Navajoe Turquoise.

Our color chart abbreviates the color names as follows:

C = Cyan, or Noodler’s Navajoe Turquoise
M = Magenta, or Noodler’s Shah’s Rose
Y = Yellow, Noodler’s Yellow
K = Black, Noodler’s Black

The 2nd horizontal row of this chart that creates colors with Noodler’s The Whiteness of the Whale uses 5 parts white and one part of the original color in the top row.

The 3rd horizontal row of colors made with black uses 5 parts of the original color in the first row and one part black.

This chart only has a few examples of colors that can be created from four basic colors of Noodler’s Ink. We encourage you readers to share your favorite ink mixing results!

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